Jenny Buckland


ACTF CEO

Formerly the General Manager and Marketing Manager of the ACTF, Jenny has extensive experience in television distribution, business, financial and legal affairs. It was Jenny who originally floated the proposal for an Australian children’s digital television channel, which culminated in the establishment of ABC3 in 2009.

7 Things Australia Can Learn from the Ofcom Report into Children’s Content

Almost everyone accepts that it’s time to re-visit the current C and P regulations and come up with a system that is fit for purpose – but just getting rid of them and doing nothing is not the solution, either. In the UK the Parliament and the regulator (Ofcom) are requiring the commercial free to air broadcasters to be part of the solution – here’s what Australians can learn from the UK.

Free TV Stumbles on Kids’ Issues at Inquiry

What’s left if we get rid of Aussie kids' TV? According to the commercial networks, 'The Bachelor', 'Masterchef' and 'Ninja Warrior' are 'kids' shows, and will be enough!

Open Sesame: the real treasure lies in Australian content

A campaign has been launched to bring US juggernaut Sesame Street to the Sunshine State. But why try to tap into American series when we have internationally-recognised, quality-made, local children's programming on our own shores? 

2018 shaping up to be a critical year for Australian children’s television

Although commercial broadcasters may be seeking to wash their hands of mandated children’s TV quotas, ACTF CEO Jenny Buckland argues the way forward lies in reform, not abandonment.

ACMA conference kicks off the Australian content conversation

A review into Australian and children’s content is underway and the Commonwealth Government has indicated that it will actively seek community and industry responses to the complex questions around support for Australian and children’s content in the future.

When broadcasters cut costs on local TV content, it’s the children who pay

The Commonwealth Government is preparing to launch a wide-ranging review of the Australian Content Standards. Even before the official announcement, the commercial broadcasters wasted no time making it clear that children’s television was their preferred target.

National Children’s Week Celebrates Children’s Right to Media

It’s National Children’s Week, a celebration of children’s rights, talents and citizenship. This year the Children’s Week Council has chosen Article 17 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child – children’s right to media – as its theme.

Six Things I Discovered At Prix Jeunesse

Prix Jeunesse has been running every two years in Munich since 1964. Its aim is to promote quality television for children worldwide – “television that enables children to see, hear and express themselves and their culture, and that enhances an awareness and appreciation of other cultures.”